Reservoir

Due to High Demand Program Design Just Added
May 17-19
Scottsdale, AZ

Click Here to Buy Now

 

Book now and save $300! This is the last time Program Design will be offered at this price! With only 25 seats available, this course  will sell out quickly!

**Added Bonus! For the first time ever, receive online access to the course materials for free! $700 Value!**

Click Here to Buy Now


 

OPT Big Dawg Blog 5 Week FREE Regional training guide is now available! 

Congrats to all those who qualifed for regionals. Blog followers can now download a 5 week FREE regional training program. Individuals should follow the blog until 5 weeks out from the competition date, then move to the template below.
 
 

 
 

April 20, 2014

0 comments

04/20/2014     

EC Client Patti Carson Masters Workout #2

 

REST DAY

 


 

April 19, 2014

7 comments

04/19/2014     

OPT Exclusive Coaching client Gary McKechnie completeing Masters Workout 1 - Max Power Clean at 215#
 
function
 
3 sets:
row 600m
20 pushups
1 rope climb
row 600m
20 pushups
1 rope climb
rest 5 min
 
- focus on technique for rope climbs - hips close to rope, minimize elbow flexion
 
being
 
20min amrap
20 thrusters 135/95#
20 chinups
20 burpees
 
Notes:
- testing
- record scores
 
 
will
 
AM
 
20 PC (135#)
25 TTB
30 pistols
15 PC (135#)
20 TTB
20 pistols
5 PC (135#)
15 TTB
10 pistols
 
PM
 
10 DL (325#)
100m HS walk
50 CTB chin up
100m axel bar lunge (165#)
10 DL (325#)
 
 
she
 
AM
 
For time:
30-20-10
PC&J (95#)
burpee box jump over (20”)
 
PM
 
for time:
100 PS (55#)
75 CTB chin up
50m FW (80#/h)
25 pHSPU

April 18, 2014

22 comments

04/18/2014     

 
" From the first day of training with Robin Lyons, she saw something in me that I didn’t know I had.  She has such a powerful way of coaching and connecting with her athletes on a personal level.  I have never met someone that believed in me and supported me the way that Robin has. She has been more than a coach, she has been a friend.  Before Crossfit, I had zero background experience in competitive sports and she knew exactly what to do and how to train me to help reach my goal this year of qualifying for Regionals. Robin has not only developed me to be physically stronger, but also mentally stronger. I have learned so much about myself and what I am capable of achieving...." 
 
--Scott Stalling-  2014 South West Regional Competitor
 
 
function
 
A1. Back squat @30X1; 3-5x5; rest 90 sec
A2. db torso row @31X0; 4-6x5; rest 30 sec btw arms; rest 90 sec
B1. db RFESS @3010; 5-7/leg x 4 sets; rest 30 sec btw legs; rest 90 sec
B2. db upright row @3110; 6-10x4; rest 90 sec
+
20 sec AD max effort
rest 3:40
x3
rest walk 6 min
x2
 
- db torso row is similar to the bent over row, but with torso rotation for moementum
- keep track of output on the AD intervals, post to comments
 
 
being
 
A. Clean and jerk build to a max
B. 90sec max MU
+
1k row for time
 
Notes:
- testing
- take your time on the clean and jerk build to true max
- 90sec MU test record total reps
- 1k is all out record times
 
 
will
 
AM
 
for time:
12-9-6
OHS (from floor, 185#)
pHSPU
 
rest as needed
 
for time:
30 thruster (185#)
 
PM
 
For time:
150 DU
75 burpees
50 Alt DB snatch (100#)
25 MU
 
 
she
 
AM
 
A. Gauntlet – every 75 sec - Snatch + Hang Snatch + OHS (start @85#, increase 10#/set)
+
for time:
Row 1k
50 wall balls
25 squat clean (135#)
 
PM
 
For time:
150 DU
30 MU
150 DU
 

April 17, 2014

4 comments

04/17/2014     

OPT Coach Micheal Bann and On-Site Client Simon demonstrating Dead Bugs (sorry for the audio quality)
 

Training the Core Beyond Sit-Ups Part 2

In a follow up to last month’s post on effective core training, this time I’d like to touch on another beneficial exercise to consider for your program.  If you have taken the assessment and program design course here at OPT you already have an understanding as to how important it is to have an individually designed program for clients in order to keep them healthy and progressing towards their goals.  Within the Level 2 midline assessment is an anti-extension component.  This anti-extension component tests pelvic control with leg lowering while in the supine position.  The goal is to avoid anterior tilt while lowering legs to 45 degrees or greater.  This anti-extension concept is one of my favorite things to do for the development of midline stability.  I love Pallof presses and all its variations but the anterior core will always be number one in my heart.  For starters, many people walk around in anterior pelvic tilt due to a number of factors such as tight hip flexors, weak posterior chain or even weak trunk flexors.  Let me be clear on this though, trunk flexors such as the rectus abdominis are better trained via anti-extension than sit ups, GHD sit ups, knees to elbows and/or toes to bar.
         If you sport requires these flexion-based movements then train for them effectively but perhaps use flexion movements less frequently.  Just like with any exercise, there are regressions and progressions, or what I prefer to call “options”.  A plank can be progressed into a diagonal plank, and straight leg sit ups into deadbugs, which can be effective exercise for a multitude of reasons. One of these reasons is the concept of reverse patterning. The basic concept of reverse patterning comes from Gray Cook in his book Movement in which you re-teach a movement from the end to the beginning.  This in essence, is how a baby learned to stand.  Babies don’t walk around then decide to squat down but rather the opposite (Cook, 2010).  They were on the ground and they decide to stand up, but mastered a few steps before this.  This concept is how I relate the deadbug to training hip separation and mobility with positive pelvic control.  The rectus abdominis (See figures 1 and 2), which is the “six pack abs” muscle, originates at the crest of the pubis and inserts on the cartilage of the 5th, 6th, and 7th ribs and the xiphoid process (Floyd, 2012) .  With that in mind, if you pull the ribs down you can use the rectus abdominis to “pull” the pelvis posteriorly.  This is how the deadbug works when done correctly.  Now you have a nice neutral flat spine, and one hip can be flexed while the other is extended.  This helps train midline endurance and also teaches hip separation which leads to more mobility within the active straight leg pattern. Similar to any other exercise you can regress or progress it.  I like to start clients with just utilizing their legs with their immobile knee and hip staying flexed at 90 degrees.  Once they show mastery of this, I progress them to using hands, which requires coordination, shoulder mobility and scapular control. Once this is no longer challenging, I upgrade them to hips remaining flexed but knees extended.  From there if they master this, I reintroduce the arms into the equation, and can even begin to load the arms or feet with ankle weights.  Tempo can vary but I’ve been a fan of using a 1511 tempo, which means there is a 5 second pause with the leg and/or hand barely off the ground.  With every variation of the deadbug the biggest focus should be “pushing” the low back into the ground and dorsiflexing the ankles.  Below you’ll find an example of how to use these movements in a program (see Sample Workout below) or during movement prep and warm up (see Sample Warm-Up below).
         In conclusion, the deadbug is not the end all be all, nor is the Pallof press, but the principles of anti-extension, anti-lateral flexion and anti-rotation are what allow you to develop a solid program to ensure you or your clients to continue making progress regardless of your fitness journey.  Try adding them into your warm up or movement prep and see how you feel!
 
 
 
Figure 1                                                           Figure 2
 
 
Sample Workout
A. Back Squat @30x1; 4-6x5 sets; Rest 3-5 minutes
B. WTD Pull ups @2111; 3,3,3,3; Rest 3 minutes – build per set
C. WTD Dips @3011; 2,2,2,2; Rest 3 minutes – build per set
D. Deadbugs @1511; 8-10/side x3 sets; Rest 60 seconds/side
 
Sample Warm-up/Movement Prep
500 meter row 80% aerobic effort
20x3 sets of glute bridges @11x5
30 toe touch progressions with toes elevated 3 inches – control tempo, not for speed
20x2 sets of deadbugs @1511 tempo
 

REST DAY


 

April 16, 2014

36 comments

04/16/2014     

The 18 mile mark at the London marathon

 

The London marathon was held this past Sunday and the buzz in the city was around Mo Farah.  As I walked around the city on Saturday, I saw a number of headlines about him winning the race on the heels on his 2012 home town Olympic win of the 5,000 m and 10,000 m track events.  

 

Ultimately Mo finished the race in 8th place, but set an English record in the process.  After the race he had this to say about his performance:

 

“Asked if he would do another marathon, Farah, who finished almost four minutes behind the winner, said: "Yeh, definitely, 100%. I'm not going to finish it like this. I will be back.

 

"I would have been disappointed to do my first marathon somewhere else. I gave it my all but I just wish I gave a little bit more to the crowd and all the supporters.

 

"It was pretty tough. I'm quite disappointed but you try things and if they don't work, at least you gave it a go. It was really just the pace - I should have gone with the front group. The pacemakers I had were slightly ahead of me but you learn - life goes on.””

 

(source:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/athletics/27009201)

 

What I like about his response to his results is that they are balanced.  He hasn’t bought into negative self talk that is going to get him stuck in the past.  He had some disappointment, his critique is a moment of reflection, and he is learning from it.  He also hasn’t bought into hyper positive self talk that is propelling him into the future (e.g. “Next year I’ve got this!).  Again, he is simply learning from the experience and moving forward with awareness and presence. 

 

Now that the dust has settled from The Opens 2014, it’s a good time to reflect upon both your performance and the year of training leading up to that.  Were you pleased with your performance overall and where are you currently sitting with your self talk around the results?  In your reflection, check your words to ensure you have a balance of past awareness with future game plans so you can can move, as some guy I know likes to say, onward!

 

Sharon Prete

CCP Life Coaching module co-conductor

OPT Team Member

1-403-971-1119

 

Attend an upcoming Life Coach Module:

 

 

 
function
 
6 sets hard:
15 sec kb swings
15 sec burpees
15 sec row cals
rest 2-4 min
 
- if you're very proficient at these movements, choose the rest time at 4 minutes, otherwise, go lower
 
 
being
 
3 rounds for time:
15 Dead Lift - 185/135#
15 Ring Dips
20 Box Jumps - 24/20" 
 
Notes:
- testing 
- compare to sat Feb 19th 2011
- http://optexperience.com/blog/item/sat-feb-19-2011
 
 
will
 
AM
 
For time @97%:
Row 3 min max cals
 
rest 15-20 min
 
For time @97%:
Row 3 min max cals
 
PM
 
3 rounds for time @97%:
8 KBS (2pd)
8 Burpee box jump
8 AD cals
 
Rest 15-20 min
 
3 rounds for time @97%:
8 KBS (2pd)
8 Burpee box jump
8 AD cals
 
 
she
 
AM
 
@97%:
AD 3 min max cals
 
Rest 15 min
 
@97%:
Row 1k
 
PM
 
For time:
500m row
20 PS (75#)
20 NPUBBJ (3-45# plates)

April 15, 2014

32 comments

04/15/2014     

UCAN Super Starch: What is it, and Who is it for?
 
In the world of supplements, processed carbohydrates are probably only second in sales to various proteins; manufacturers would have you believe it’s absolutely essential to be properly fueled with engineered sugars before, during and after training to succeed.  While science has told us (and I agree fully) that carbs are an essential fuel and refueling source, some of what is pitched is a bit shaky.
 
UCAN is a product that falls under this umbrella; it’s basically a refined form of corn.  Similar product would include all forms of WMS (waxy-maize starch) or barley (Vitargo).  While UCAN has an attractive history of being designed for use in treating pediatric glycogen storage diseases, it’s essentially just…refined corn.  The molecular weight does play a role, but before we get into that, I want to clarify this:
 
Processed Carb Continuum:
Dextrose (g-glucose)--sucrose (glucose/fructose) --maltodextrin--amylopectin (polysaccharide, where UCAN would fit in).  Basically, this can be interpreted as the speed of breakdown, and speed of increase in glycemic index/insulin
 
The major selling point of UCAN and the like is the high molecular weight; but what exactly does this mean?
 “Low osmolality”---high molecular weight.  Basically big-assed molecules of starch = lower osmolality.  Water goes from low to high concentration in regards to osmolality, therefore, drawn into systemic circulation without resultant water being drawn into GI tract = less GI issues/boating. With dextrose, low molecular weight, HIGH osmolality, and potential for bloat due to water being drawn INTO the GI tract.
This is the main selling point---it is (in theory) absorbed faster than either dextrose or maltodextrin.  This is actually incorrect, and like most marketing, is based on weak & biased science.  Waxy maize must enter the intestines where pancreatic amylase can break down the remainder into maltose (disaccharide), maltriose (trisaccharide), and a group of alpha-limit dextrins (shorter chains of amylopectin), which contain branch points from amylopectin. Then, maltose and maltriose are broken down by hydrolysis into molecules of glucose. Then, alpha-limit dextrins (amylopectin) go through the process again to be broken down.  So is it absorbed faster, or broken down slower?  Interesting question.
Regardless, empirically we see that folks who bloat like overstuff turkeys on dextrose and other simple carbs LIKE high-molecular weight polymers.  This can be a huge plus for an athlete.  Personally, I find maltodextrin to be a nice middle ground, vs. a WMS.  And yes, I know malto was used as the active control in UCAN’s self-funded study.  While you’ll have to dig up the whole study for light nighttime reading, that’s a nice segue into the next point:
Amylopectin and amylose are both complex molecules of carbohydrates (key point). Amylose is easier to break down because it’s a linear chain. Amylopectin however, is highly branched. The more branches amylopectin has, the more time it takes to break down. This reflects its lower glycemic index and high molecular weight---and basically negates the whole point of a "fast acting carb".   In the PWO period, mixed-modal athletes *WANT* a carb that both has a high GI, is fast absorbed, and spikes insulin---not a low GI carb that is absorbed without an insulin spike.
 
Who would want a GI safe, slow release/slow breakdown polysaccharide that affects insulin less that a simple sugar, and enables fat to be continued to be used as fuel?  An endurance athlete.
 
For the record this stuff mixes terrible, settles like chalk, and makes a mess of my black granite counters.
 
Mike Kesthely
1-403-715-1073
 
 
 
 
function
 
5 sets:
20 walking lunges
10 chin ups
10 toes to bar
20 box jump step-downs
40 double unders
rest 3 min
 
- switch order per set and post times to comments
 
 
being
 
A. Close grip bench press @30X0 build to a max 
B. Close grip bench press @30X0 amrap set 85% of A 
+
45mins Z1 AD 
every 5min practice HS walk 10-15ft alternate every 5mins with MU work 3-5reps or tech 
 
Notes: 
- testing 
- CGBP build to a true absolute max rest as needed in as many sets as needed 
- make sure spotter is present you get one attempt and must keep tempo 
- easy AD Z1 plus skill work to flush and feel good for tomorrow
 
 
will
 
AM  
 
A. Jerk; 3,2,2,1,1; rest 2-3 min (from rack, last 2 singles tough)
B. Push press - build to a heavy set of 2
+
3 rounds for time:
25 double KB S2OH (2pd)
10 HPS (155#)
 
PM
 
15-10-5
PC (225#)
pHSPU
 
Rest as needed
 
for time:
50 wall ball (30#)
40 TTB
30 wall ball
20 TTB
10 wall ball
 
 
she
 
AM
A. Emom 8 min – Muscle snatch + snatch balance (75-95#)
B. PS – build to a heavy single
C. for time: 25 pHSPU
+
3 rounds for time:
20 TTB
15 box jump (24”)
PM
A. SJ – tough single
B. 5 sets - PC  x 1+ PJ x 5; rest 2 min (build from 95#)
+
Row 1k

rest 2 min

5 rounds for time:
5 Thruster (125#)
1 RC
rest 2 min
Row 1k

Tags: Ucan

April 14, 2014

45 comments

04/14/2014     

Photo taken by James in Gloucester north of Boston; quick stop for some reflection on the way to Sweden for CCP program design and life coaching modules.
 
 
function
 
A1. RDL @2020; 8 reps; 4 sets; rest 30 sec
A2. db bench press @21X1; 10-12 reps; 4 sets; rest 30 sec
A3. db snatch 16 reps alt'ing arms/rep; 4 sets; rest 30 sec
A4. 8 kb windmills; 4 sets; rest 2 min
+
30 sec AD @90%
rest 30 sec
x10
 
- focus on form and stability for the kb windmills
 
 
being
 
3 sets max effort
Row 250m
15 KBS 2/1.5pd
25 burpees
15 KBS 2/1.5pd
Row 250m
rest 12mins exactly
 
Notes:
- testing
- goal is best possible time each set
- must rest exactly 12mins no longer
- record scores for each set
 
 
will
 
AM
 
A. Snatch; 3@80%, 2@85@, 2@90%, 1@90%+; rest 2-3 min
B. BS @20X1; 2,2,2,2; rest 2-3 min (85%)
C1. 3 sets - AD 15 cals @high effort; rest 15 sec
C2. 10 thruster (95#); rest 15 sec
C3. 15 CTB chin up unbroken; rest 3 min
+
for time:
8-6-4-2
Snatch (full,155#)
Burpee MU
 
PM
 
Row 500m @90%
Rest walk 3 min
x 10
 
 
she
 
4/4
 
AM
 
A. BS @20X1; 3,3,2,2,1,1; rest 2-3 min
B. Gauntlet – Snatch (Regionals style 2012)
C1. AD 15 cals @high effort; rest 15 sec
C2. DU x 50 unbroken; rest 15 sec
C2. 14 CTB chin up unbroken; rest 2 min
+
for time:
9-7-5
Clean (155#)
Burpee bar MU
 
PM
 
AD 60 min @Z1
- every 5 min get off and complete 10 single unders, 15 sec FLR
 

page: 12345...154